Cyber Security

SecurityRI Cyber Trends

Cyber Security Trends to Watch in 2019

Another year has passed, technology has evolved and new techniques have been learned – especially for the Cyber-Thieves.

With the use of artificial intelligence (AI) and biopmetrics, hackers are using the two platforms as entry points when entering your technology device. Below we’ll highlight some of the expected threats in 2019, to be aware of.

  1. Phishing Scams Will Become More Popular

If you think phishing scams were bad last year, 2019 will develop greatly. New attack types have been created, improved execution – especially, via e-mail.

Phishing Sams

3. Slight Decrease in Crypto Currency Attacks

In the face of huge commissions, slow transfers, a large price for integration, and, most importantly, a small number of customers, the use of crypto currency as a method of payment has declined steadily from 2017 and will continue to decline in 2019.

Crypto

2. Improved Execution of Existing Attacks

In 2018, cyber attacks and data breaches continued to increase in both frequency and intensity, and organizations can expect more of the same in 2019, according to experts. The biggest cyber security event of 2018 is probably just the sheer number of data breaches that have occurred across industry sectors, some utilizing advanced attacks, others as a result of mistakes made by the affected organizations.

Data Breach

4. Mobile, in-app Malware

While malware that runs on the Windows operating system vastly outnumbers malware for any other platform, users of mobile devices are increasingly subject to malicious activity that pushes malware apps to their phones, tablets, or other devices running Android and iOS, according to computer network security company Sophos’ 2019 Threat Report.

Malware

5. Attacks through Theft of AI & Biometric Data

While several major leaks of biometric data have already occurred globally, the Middle East and Africa regions could see the first attacks in the theft and use of biometric data in 2019. As more biometric systems for user identification and authentication are being implemented by various financial institutions in META (Middle East, Turkey and Africa), 2019 will see criminals exposing vulnerabilities in passcodes, touch ID sensors and facial recognition.

Bio Hacks

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Cyber Tips for the Holidays

TOP 7 Cyber Security Tips For The Holidays

With the holidays approaching many busy Americans will be purchasing items and gifts online. The rise in activity will gear up the cyber thieves as well. Thieves will be targeting the vulnerable customers with their latest scams.

Even if you’re careful, internet shoppers will be exposing their personal information more frequently, which raises the scamming risk. Therefore, no better time than now to take a few moments and confirm you’re doing all you can do to protect your information and preventing cyber-crime.

Below we will highlight 7 Cyber Security Tips to Help Reduce Your RISK:

  1. Don’t Reuse Passwords

Despite security expert’s advice to NEVER reuse the same username and password across multiple websites, according to a 2017 Consumer Mobile Security App Use study by Keeper Security, a staggering number of people admitted to doing just that.

Respondents ages 18-30 stated they reuse passwords 87% of the time, while respondents ages 31+ reuse passwords 81% of the time. There’s no doubt remembering passwords is tedious, but taking this “short cut” can significantly make it easier for cyber criminals to access your accounts.

To make matters worse, if you use the same username, a hacker can simply guess your password and search or enter your username into popular online websites to get access to your accounts.

2. The Safe Way to Remember Passwords

There’s a lot of debate when it comes to password security and what actually qualifies as a secure password, but one thing is for sure – it’s not a good idea to save passwords in your browser. If your computer was compromised and all passwords were stored in your browser, hackers could easily gain access to all your accounts. As an alternative, consider using a secure password manager like LastPass or Roboform instead.

3. Use Secure Passwords

Whenever possible, use 2-step verification, which is often seen on popular websites like Facebook and Gmail when you’re prompted to enter your phone number in addition to your password. Mobile devices and some laptops offer 2-step verification in the form of fingerprint identification as well.

4. Update Social Media Privacy Settings

It’s a common mistake to assume your privacy settings will remain intact across social media profiles. In reality, social media networks can perform updates that suddenly make your profile public. This presents an opportunity for cyber criminals to gather data from your social profiles and use that information to gain access to your other accounts. For this reason, it’s a good idea to get into the habit of checking your social profile privacy settings once a month and Googling your name to see what your profiles look like to the public.

5. Close Down Old Accounts

While reviewing privacy settings across your social accounts, consider closing down old accounts you no longer use. In addition, you can disconnect old apps you’ve previously connected to your Google account. The more “connected” your Google account is to apps, the more likely it is that some of your information is being shared with unknown parties you might not be aware of.

6. Engage in Safe Online Shopping

If you plan to do some online shopping this season, consider creating a free email address via Gmail or Yahoo for online shopping sites specifically.

This allows you to keep your primary email address separate in the event your email is compromised or bombarded with junk email.

Use this “throw away account” for coupons, shopping sites or new websites you encounter.

Before you consider purchasing from a new website, be sure to Google the name of the business + reviews to see what others are saying and verify the website is legitimate. You’ll want to be especially cautious if the price of the product seems too good to be true.

7. Avoid Shopping on Public Wi-Fi Networks

While out and about on a shopping trip, be careful when accessing the web on public Wi-Fi networks. You might be tempted to order that hard-to-find item online while taking a break at your local coffee shop, but don’t give in to that temptation. Public Wi-Fi networks are a prime target for hackers. It’s best to use secure Wi-Fi networks for purchases or accessing banking information.

Most of all, be safe, be cautious and enjoy the holiday season!

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Security Plan

Implement A Security Plan For Your Business

First, What is a Security Plan?

A Security Plan or System Plan documents the controls that have been selected to mitigate the risk of a system. The controls are determined by a Risk Analysis.

Assisting with the process NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) provides a catalog of controls with templates outlining the Cybersecurity Framework for Critical Infrastructure and Security Plan. Businesses may use the outline when creating their Security Plan.

How to Implement Your Security Plan?

1. Take an inventory of your physical and information assets (what are you protecting?).
2. Perform a risk assessment to determine what level of security is needed to protect your information assets.
3. Complete the checklist to make you aware of your security strengths and weaknesses
4. Complete an evaluation. Evaluate your findings and discuss recommendations to correct deficiencies and/or improve security with departmental administration and IT staff.
5. Develop a security plan. Create a plan with target dates for implementation.
6. Set Deadlines / Completion Dates
7. Project Management – Monitor the process from start to finish
8. Evaluate upon completion

Responsibilities for a Departmental Security Plan

  1. Inventory – IT Staff
  2. Risk Assessment – Systems Administrator
  3. Checklist – Systems Administrator
  4. Evaluation – Systems Administrator
  5. Plan – IT Staff & Systems Administrator

What does a simple IT security plan schedule look like?

Tasks Example:
  1. Draft Security Plan
  2. Submit Plan for review by other managers / outsourced IT company for this process.
  3. Edit
  4. Finalize Security Plan
  5. Submit to Board of Directors “if needed”
  6. Distribute the Plan to all Management
  7. Distribute the Plan to all Personnel
  8. Meet with Management – set dates – begin implementation
  9. Establish means to accomplish Security Tasks and events
  10. Establish Security Breach Committee
  11. Establish Proactive Security Committee
  12. Obtain and install required new equipment if needed (servers, workstations, programs, etc.)
  13. Implement new policies (ex – clean desk, remote working, etc.)
  14. Evaluate the implementation
  15. Evaluate Security Program
    1. Internal Review
    2. External Review
  16. Modify Security Program and Plan
    1. Schedule follow up meetings / audit
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Surveillance Cameras in RI

Protect Your Surveillance Cameras

Did you know cyber-thieves can breach your surveillance camera system if not secured correctly?

Surveillance Cameras serve as a point of entry into the IP network of organizations of all types. As an IP based device and without proper measures to protect them, hackers can use them to shut down surveillance or to tap into the organization’s data. Both represent real risks that need immediate attention.

The good news is that there are immediate, high impact measures that security professionals can implement and architect to ensure your camera system is safe & secure!

If you have cameras or you’re preparing to install a new system, here are some tips you should be educated on:

  1. Camera Passwords ARE Important

    If your security cameras still use the default manufacturer password or a weak, common password, you are at immediate risk for a security breach. Hackers can write programs that will attempt hundreds of passwords in the blink of an eye. If your passwords aren’t updated regularly with significant difficulty, you are making it even easier for hackers to take down your cameras.

    Try utilizing a Secure Password Generator for creating strong passwords.

  2. Lock Down your Network

    Because cameras are often located in unsecured places around the perimeter of a building or in hallways, it is essential to ensure that your cameras are the only devices that can communicate across your network. Your network has a feature called MAC Binding that configures each network port to only accept the specific, unique MAC address from the camera bound to that port. This way, if a hacker tries to replace the camera with a laptop, the network will reject the communication. Seek tools to make this management easy and ability to upgrade.

  3. Isolate Your Cameras

    Don’t put cameras on the same corporate network as your workstations. Isolate your cameras with a Virtual LAN (VLAN) so that the only thing that can talk to them is the Video Management System (VMS).

  4. Don’t Ignore Unusual Events

    Take note of even short outages or sudden camera reboots. These small, seemingly insignificant events can indicate security breaches, such as foreign firmware uploads or hacker devices being introduced to the network.

  5. Two Operators equals Less Risk

    Your cameras should be set up with two logins the same way that your computers are set up; one login is a user with limited privileges, the other is an administrator with full access. The camera admin login should be used rarely for updates, and the user login should handle everyday tasks, like streaming video. That way, the more commonly used login cannot do as much damage if it falls into the wrong hands.

  6. Purchase Cameras from Companies with a Reputation for Security

    Not all camera brands are created equal. The security of certain brands and cameras with certain countries of origin have been questioned. Reputable companies should be on the forefront of security concerns, and have rapid response time to vulnerabilities. Do your research before a major system purchase.

For additional information on Secure Surveillance Cameras, please contact us below, we are always glad to assist!

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